Adults

Select a program listed below to learn more information

What is ACT?


Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) is a way of delivering a full range of services to people who have been diagnosed with a severe mental illness or co-occurring disorder. ACT provides supports to help people maintain their independence in the community. The goal of ACT is to keep people out of the hospital and help them to have a life that isn’t dominated by their mental illness.

What makes ACT Different?


ACT is a team approach to service delivery. An ACT team is made up of practitioners who have training and experience in psychiatry, nursing, social work, substance abuse treatment, and employment. Rather than sending people to different agencies or providers for services, members of the team work closely together to provide individuals with a highly integrated array of services that best meet their needs.

Teams provide whatever services and supports an individual may need for as long as they are needed. As individuals progress toward their recovery goals, team members are in touch less often but continue to be available if a need for additional support arises.

What is Community Living Supports


Community Living Supports provides individualized services that make it possible for people with intellectual / developmental disabilities to live independently. The amount of support provided is tailored specifically to each individual and can involve as little as one or two hours a month to as much as several hours each week to assist with such things as meal preparation and laundry.

What is the Creative Arts Program?


The arts help people break through the stigmas surrounding mental health and substance use disorders — and help people recover. The arts help people with developmental disabilities build new life skills.

Art Classes


Learning to draw and paint can be a challenge - but it can also be a lot of fun. Painting allows you to express your thoughts and feelings without words, providing you a unique voice with which to communicate with the world, all the while developing your creativity and imagination. If you would like to learn drawing and painting techniques, or how to do pottery in a friendly and supportive environment, the CMH art class is right for you!

Drama Classes


Acting is a great way to build self-confidence, improve social skills, work with others as a team, improve memorization, practice relaxation techniques, communicate better with others, think creatively, and have fun. Drama class allows students to work on social skills in a safe, fun, environment, that is different than most other classes. Participants will have an opportunity to learn acting skills on the stage and film.

Participants in the drama class also have an opportunity to participate in the CMH Players, a theatre troupe which includes individuals receiving community mental health services, local community actors, and CMH staff.

Since 2005 the CMH Players have presented 19 plays with mental health themes to thousands of people. These productions have decreased stigma and provided individuals receiving services an outlet for their creative talents. The CMH Players also create original films and skits with mental health themes.

Interested, but not sure about appearing on stage? Join the class and decide later if the stage is for you. If you think you could benefit from drama class, don’t be shy, get on stage and have your moment in the spot light!

Writing Classes


Why do people write? They write to share their hopes and dreams, failures and successes, hates and loves, or simply to share their thoughts. They write because they have a story to tell, either their own or one bubbling up from their imagination.

Writing class participants have an opportunity to learn how to write poetry, short stories, song lyrics, memoirs, journals, plays, and screenplays. If you have a story to tell, want to explore different types of writing, or just want to improve your writing skills, the friendly and supportive environment of the CMH writing class is right for you.

What is Dialectical Behavioral Training (DBT)


Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a treatment for individuals diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), a serious mental illness characterized by difficulty regulating emotions, thoughts, behaviors, self-perception, and interpersonal relationships. It is an “evidence-based” therapy, meaning it is based on research studies that provide statistical evidence of its effectiveness. DBT is currently considered the most effective treatment available for individuals with BPD.

Participation represents a year-long commitment on the part of the individual joining the DBT program. Participants agree to weekly individual therapy, to attend weekly skills group meetings (2 hours), and to learn and practice the four skill sets mentioned earlier. They may also be linked to a peer support, who assist individuals in learning skills and applying them to everyday life. Participants also agree to accept coaching calls on a 24-hour a day, seven days a week basis. The program begins with a four to six week orientation where the requirements and responsibilities of the individual receiving services are clearly explained.

What is Health Matters?


The Health Matters Program is for adults with Intellectual Disabilities that includes Exercise, Nutrition, and Health Education components. The goals of the program are to improve fitness and increase knowledge about healthy lifestyles. The health education classes consist of activities helping participants to understand their attitudes towards health, exercise, and food. Exercises are utilized that are fun and help participants set fitness goals. There are no health restrictions on who can apply, but people with a health concern are a priority. Participation requires a medical clearance form signed by a participant’s doctor.

What is Home and Community Based Services (HCBS)


HCBS is Home and Community Based Services with the following main components:

  • Individual rights: includes privacy, dignity, respect and freedom.
  • Full participation in community life: includes finding a job, working amongst those without disabilities and taking part in the community to the same degree of access as other individuals in their community.
  • Independence in making life decisions: includes making decisions, controlling and choosing where you live, with who, service providers, how you spend your days, how you spend your money and what you choose to eat.

To learn more contact:
Brooke Sniesak
(810) 966-3746
bsniesak@scccmh.org

What is Individual Placement Services (IPS)


The Individual Placement and Support (IPS) program helps people with severe mental illness find and keep competitive community jobs. To qualify for the IPS program an individual must have a severe mental illness and want to work. Participants are considered work ready, seeing prospective employers within 30 days of entering the program. IPS seeks to find a natural “fit” between an individual and competitive jobs in the community by helping individuals identify their personal strengths, skills, and job interests. Program participants work in a variety of different types of businesses including factory, office, restaurant, fast food, and medical locations.

What is InSHAPE


InSHAPE is a wellness program designed especially for people who have a severe mental illness.

InSHAPE goals include improving your physical health and quality of life, reducing your risk of diseases, increasing your lifespan, teaching you ways to reduce stress and supporting recovery from mental illness

InSHAPE helps you learn to set fitness goals. It helps you exercise. It teaches you how to eat healthy. InSHAPE also teaches you how to pay attention to your medical needs.

The Health Mentor will:


  • Monitor your exercise program
  • Go with you to the gym
  • Give home exercise programs
  • Teach about home exercise equipment
  • Show how to use exercise equipment
  • Show how to perform low impact exercises without equipment
  • Show how to make a healthy shopping list
  • Teach how to shop and cook
  • Review your weekly food log
  • Teach healthy eating habits


The Requirements


To join InSHAPE you must:
  • Receive services from your local County Community Mental Health in Lapeer, Sanilac or St. Clair.
  • Be 18 years or older
  • Have a severe mental illness
  • Have one or more of the following:
    • Cardiovascular Disease
    • High Blood Pressure
    • High Cholesterol
    • Diabetes (Type I or II)
    • Obesity (BMI 30 or greater)

What is Integrated Dual Disorder Treatment (IDDT)


The Integrated Dual Disorder Treatment (IDDT) model is an evidence-based practice that improves quality of life for people with co-occurring severe mental illness and substance use disorders by combining substance abuse services with mental health services. It helps people address both disorders at the same time—in the same service organization by the same team of treatment providers. IDDT emphasizes that individuals achieve big changes like sobriety, symptom management, and an increase in independent living through a series of small, overlapping, incremental changes that occur over time. Therefore, IDDT takes a stages-of-change approach to treatment, which is individualized to address the unique circumstances of each person’s life.

What is Mental Health Court


The St. Clair County Mental Health Court is a voluntary program and joint collaboration between the 72nd District Court and St. Clair County Community Mental Health. The program is available to misdemeanor offenders who have a severe mental illness or developmental disability. People accepted into the program have weekly hearings, must abstain from drugs and alcohol and are required to follow through with their mental health treatments.

What is OBRA


OBRA, the Nursing Home Reform Act of 1987, stipulates that all residents of Medicaid certified nursing homes are evaluated annually to determine if they have a mental illness or intellectual / developmental disability. CMH provides these evaluations free of charge. If an individual needs specialized services for a mental illness or intellectual / developmental disability and do not require continuous nursing care or medical supervision, CMH will assist in arranging treatment outside of the nursing home environment.

What is Outpatient?


The Outpatient program allows individuals receiving services to stay at home and live in the community while they work on their recovery.

What is The Galley?


The Galley is a public cafeteria that serves lunch and snacks at the Port Huron office of St. Clair County Community Mental Health.

Food at The Galley is prepared and served by individuals enrolled in a hands-on training program. This six month program teaches culinary arts, safe food handling, customer service and job skills to individuals receiving services from St. Clair County Community Mental Health.

Catering services for meetings and business events are also available upon special request.

The Program


Professional culinary staff train up to sixteen (16) students per session. Students attend 2-3 days per week from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. One session meets Tuesdays and Thursdays and every other Friday. The second session meets Mondays and Wednesdays and alternate Fridays.

Trainees must commit to regular on-time attendance. They perform all the duties and tasks of any food service operation with the goal of being ready for a job in food service when they are done with the program.

The Requirements


Persons interested in joining the Galley program must:
  • Currently receive services from St. Clair County Community Mental Health
  • Meet certain minimum physical requirements
  • Have a desire to pursue a career in food service

For more Information


Contact The Galley at St. Clair County Community Mental Health to inquire about the Food Service Training Program.
(810) 966-3390

The Sail-In Café & Convenience Store


The Sail In Café & Convenience Store is located adjacent to the new Blue Water Area Transit Bus Depot at 722 McMorran Boulevard in Port Huron, across from McMorran Place. It is more than just another quick stop for chips, candy, and pop. In addition to providing a place for transit riders to purchase refreshments, healthy snacks, basic grocery and personal care items, it is also a job training site for individuals in need of support on their path to employment.

Phone: (810) 966-4223

What is Supported Community Integration Services?


The Supported Community Integration Services program allows individuals with a developmental disability supported accessibility to traditional work and community programs, while living independently.

What is Veteran Services?


CMH has a service specifically designed to assist veterans with accessing treatment, navigating the VA system and linking up with other community resources. Any veteran can access these services regardless of:
  • Age
  • Type of insurance or no insurance
  • Income level
  • Combat status
  • Type of discharge
  • Length of military service

We Can Help!


The veteran services at CMH are peer-led, meaning the Navigator is also a veteran. The Veteran Navigator can assist you with:
  • The VA benefit enrollment process
  • Accessing other community resources such as housing, employment or health care
  • Enrolling in mental health services

To learn more contact our Veteran Navigator:

Wendy Martindale
(810) 966-3755
wmartindale@scccmh.org
Need Help Now?